Cheese tasting like a bad smell, what do you really do with it?

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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Langres from Germain of France has provided me with a new cheese experience. Brie-like cheese smelling mildly of horse manure, and giving the sensation that it's tasting even more so than it smells. Is there a special application for this stuff, or do some just think this raw experience way cool?
 
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I see lots of views no no comments.

So, to describe it better, the horse manure smell just seems to bounce back and forth from tongue to nostrils, the sensations getting greatly magnified with each bounce. Certainly never experienced anything else even remotely like it, nor do I think I care too again.

So I really need to know, do some actually find this enjoyable?

Or is this just an unhappy consequence you might find eating this cheese near the end of it's eating window, which I have found is always the end of December [being as it is always prepared in spring]?

Look I've had French cheese the taste of which left me unable to fathom its appeal, and I've met French persons who admit they can pass on camenbert, but this one takes it to a whole 'nother level and quality of uncertainty.
 
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There’s not much to say. You don’t like it. What a shame but a good learning experience. Did other folks suffer the same bad taste? Often with ripe stinky cheese there seems to be a diversity of individual experience. I think some is just inherent but suspect that some may be influenced by medications etc. There also seems to be influences from how it’s served and eaten: type of cracker, fruit/pickle accompaniment, etc.

how did you eat this one?

and, yes, chances are high that it was more “tolerable” when young. :)
 
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I can't answer your original question, but if it were me that cheese would be fed to the chickens. I don't eat things I don't like regardless of expectations.

We made a swiss potato dish once that looked delicious on paper. It called for a specific imported cheese. I hunted the cheese down, paid a good bit for it and made the dish. The cheese was awful, similar to what you are describing. I did taste it before cooking and it was mildly unpleasant, I hoped that the cooking process and combination with the other ingrediants were what made it good - I was wrong. Baking it made it worse. The chickens ate well that week.
 
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Ahaha yeh, I know what chickens get fed commercially, and so see no reason they wouldn't feast on this one. But its seems to me you'd have to be into some serious fetishes to enjoy this one, regardless of what you put it in/on. I'll grant it one thing, it is intense.

Never had Surstr?mming, but would guess these two kindred spirits. Saw no instructions on the net for eating it, nothing that outs it's character in any specific way, but if I can get up the nerve to try it again maybe I'll try burying a tiny bit in jam as well as cracker stuff. But I feel like a pervert just thinking about ingesting it again.
 
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I enjoy cheese, but there are many I simply avoid. And I've never had a problem finding fresh, inexpensive sources of horse manure when inclination or the recipe calls for it ;?)
 
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When a cheese starts to smell and taste too strong, melt it. Most of the offending smell/taste will be reduced to mild. Here's an idea (we call it tartiflette):

1) Boil some potatoes. Peel and cube them, place in a gratin dish.
2) In a pan, saute some cubed bacon. Add some onions slices and sweat them. Deglaze with white dry wine and reduce to almost dry. Add some whipping cream and reduce by half. Drizzle over the cubed potatoes.
3) Slice the offending cheese and layer the cheese slice on top of the potatoes.
4) Broil until golden brown.

The cheese should melt and gravity helps the melting cheese carry the bacon/onions mix down inside the potatoes along with it. The top crust should be golden brown and crispy. Make sure everyone you serve gets both some of the creamy potato/bacon/onion mix and golden brown crust along with it, they're delicious together.

Enjoy on a cold evening with a good bottle of French white wine. Condrieu comes to mind if you can find (and afford) it. Chignin-Bergeron is also a great choice. However any cheap wine from Savoie will do just fine. This isn't, after all, any kind of old traditional recipe that beckons your respect by any means, just a cheap way to eat old smelly cheese recently invented by the Reblochon syndicate. ;) Still it's good stuff to eat!
 
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French Fries - that's the dish and cheese I was talking about! I could not remember the name. It looks so good on paper, but I'd never had Reblochon before and didn't know how bad it was. In our case, it got worse once cooked.

No thank you!!
 
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French Fries - that's the dish and cheese I was talking about! I could not remember the name. It looks so good on paper, but I'd never had Reblochon before and didn't know how bad it was. In our case, it got worse once cooked.
Aaaah? Sorry to hear. Langres isn't supposed to be a very strong cheese to start with so perhaps the one you got was way too old.
 
2,810
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Aaaah? Sorry to hear. Langres isn't supposed to be a very strong cheese to start with so perhaps the one you got was way too old.
That did it, tossed it without further experimentation. Apparently this pretty puck of cheese didn't successfully make it to it's end of December consumption date. Still, never imagined a cheese could turn into something like that, and still look like a cheese.
 

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