Best practices for searing bone-in filet

7
0
Joined Dec 16, 2017
I am once again in charge of Christmas dinner for ~15 people and doing my version of a tasting menu with several small to moderate size courses. One of the courses is going to be bone-in filet mignon that I will slice and accompany with a sauce and sides of sweet potato mash and greens. I just ordered eight 14 oz prime bone-in filets and now I have to figure out how I am going to cook them.

We had a high-end grill at our old house that did a great job, but we have since moved and I am without a good grill for the time being (other than a borrowed Weber that I only find suitable for basic burgers, dogs, BBQ chicken, etc...). That said, we do have a semi-professional grade gas range that can get as hot as necessary to put a good sear on and has a broiler in the oven that will get to ~1800 degrees. I have seared steaks before on it with success, but also have botched a few as well.

That said, I am looking for some professional advice on how best to cook a bone-in filet to get top notch steak house results. I've read about several ways to do it including sear and bake, reverse sear, sear only, broil only, etc... Any advice from you pros on best and most consistent methods of cooking a bone-in steak? Also, ideas for a good sauce to accompany that can be made in advance?

Thank-you!
 
997
586
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Sear and bake.

Use a heavy gauge cast iron pan and get that thing screamin red hot with the highest smoke point oil you can find/afford. What you're going to be doing here is searing those fillets both sides and on the edges and then, finishing them in the oven. Btw, the bone in is wonderful, but, its going to work against you here. But, you've already ordered and presumably paid for the fillets, so you're in it to win it no matter what now. Then again, you could always trim those bones and make some delicious stock. Just a thought.

Anyway, prep enough of whatever you're going to put in the pan with the fillets for 14 fillets......rosemary sprigs, garlic....etc. Cooke them a few at a time. If the heaviest, biggest pan you have will only do two at a time, then do two and so on. Make sure you don't crowd the pan and don't forget the butter. Baste with butter as you sear.

Remove the seared fillets to a roasting pan and finish in the oven to the desired temp.

Btw, don't forget to deglaze that pan and make some delish pan sauce. ;-)

Cheers and Happy Holidays! :)
 
7
0
Joined Dec 16, 2017
Thanks for the replies. So I have one recommendation to reverse sear, one to sear and bake, and one to cook a tenderloin roast.

The roast is out as we've already ordered the steaks - and my family generally prefers a nice steak over a roast.

As to the other two, I can sear and bake and how sgsvirgil described is more or less how I've been doing it. As long as I keep an eye on them they usually come out pretty good. But, it doesn't take much extra time to overcook them and with everything else that's going to be going on I need to stay on top of things.

I've never reverse seared but am intrigued by the concept. Seems to be a bit more controlled than the sear and bake method, but still might be a bit risky to make my first attempt for Christmas dinner. Maybe I'll cook a few steaks up tonight or tomorrow trying the different methods.

One question: Regardless of which method I use, if I am going to deglaze the pan and make a sauce would a stainless steel or cast iron pan be preferable? I have both, but I typically come up with better sauces when I use the stainless. Any advice for a quick and easy sauce I can make while the steak sits?

Thanks again for the suggestions.

Matt
 
4,617
834
Joined Aug 21, 2004
beurre rouge (real version not a cream version)
reduction done 3/4 of the way ahead of time if doing reverse sear on steaks, if not then probably not necessary to do reduction ahead
 
5,542
443
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I would sear and bake. Moreover that's what you already have experience with.

Regardless of which method I use, if I am going to deglaze the pan and make a sauce would a stainless steel or cast iron pan be preferable? I have both, but I typically come up with better sauces when I use the stainless.
Sounds to me like both the question and the answer. ;)

Any advice for a quick and easy sauce I can make while the steak sits?
It sounds to me like you have a quality steak which needs no sauce. I would consider serving the steak with a dab of really good quality butter (don't skimp, it's expensive). If you absolutely must somewhat impress your guests then maybe do a prepared butter, for example with preserved green peppercorns (not the dried ones) and a few pink peppercorns, perhaps finely minced chives or shallots. As for the pan, simply deglaze it thoroughly with good quality water and pour the "jus"in a saucier. If you absolutely must somewhat impress
your guests, add a few fresh herbs and garlic to the water while deglazing, and strain when pouring in the saucier. But I wouldn't even do that. I would keep it simple.

The key is in the execution. A well executed steak needs very little help.

Is it a frozen steak? If it is, pay attention to the thawing process: thaw in the fridge, leave plenty of room between the steaks, between each steak and the walls of the fridge. I would wrap each steak individually in cloth and rest them on a cooling rack so there's air flow on all sides even the bottom. Treat each one like a little treasure and they will be fantastic.

Now look at what you've done, you've made me crave a good steak. :lol:
 
997
586
Joined Mar 1, 2017
One question: Regardless of which method I use, if I am going to deglaze the pan and make a sauce would a stainless steel or cast iron pan be preferable? I have both, but I typically come up with better sauces when I use the stainless. Any advice for a quick and easy sauce I can make while the steak sits?

Thanks again for the suggestions.

Matt
What pan you use, cast iron or something else, will make a difference when you go to make a pan sauce. That difference is the cast iron is reactive and if you use acidic ingredients such as wine to deglaze the pan, it probably won't turn out well. If you have a heavy gauge pan that's not cast iron, you may want to use that so you can keep your options open. Ideally, if you have an enamel coated cast iron pan, that would be the one to use. Otherwise, stainless steel will do.

You could make a slight roux based pan sauce. I assume you know how that's done so, I won't get into that here. But, in case you don't, say so and I will be happy to explain.

If the roux technique is not what you're after, use a combination of red wine and demi glace (or stock) to deglaze the pan. I typically make a batch of demi glace ahead of the holidays for gravies and pan sauces. In fact, I just finished making a batch to use next week. Once the fond and the bits are dissolved into the liquid, I let it reduce and season, if necessary. Once the liquid has reduced enough, I turn off the heat, I toss in a few chunks of cold butter and stir until the butter dissolves into the liquid. The cold butter will cause it to thicken a bit. Make sure you keep stirring until the butter is melted and completely incorporated so it doesn't break. Strain the sauce through a fine mesh strainer, if desired.

Remember, you are cooking 14 individual fillets presumably in one pan. Even if you use two or three pans, there's going to be quite a bit of blackened bits. While the bits add flavor and body to your pan sauce, too much can make your pan sauce taste terrible. Assuming you use butter, herbs and garlic when cooking your fillets, make it a point to empty out the used herbs and garlic into a bowl after searing each batch of steaks and use fresh replacements with each batch. That way, you avoid burnt garlic, herbs and butter collecting in the pan and ruining the pan sauce. When you go to make your pan sauce, you will have some intensely flavored fat to add to the pan.

I hope this helps.

Cheers and Happy Holidays! :)
 
7
0
Joined Dec 16, 2017
Thanks for all the great replies. I have experimented the past couple days cooking a couple filets I bought at our local mart. So far I have done the regular "pan sear and bake at 400" method and also tried a reverse sear.

The sear and bake method yielded good results with a nice amount of flavor- though still missing just a bit of that high-end steak house touch. I think it was ultimately a bit too moist/juicy and not quite crusty enough. I made sure it was dry before searing and I did cook it on a rack in the oven but I find baking at the end often allows the crust to soften up a bit. It was really good and any other day would be a perfectly fine meal, but I'm trying to take this to the next level.

The reverse sear resulted in a steak with less flavor, but was more consistently cooked - as I expected since it is a more controlled method. I think it would be a great method if I could figure out how to impart a bit more flavor into the steak. And by flavor I mean added balance between the steak and from the added salt/pepper and herbs that I cook it with. Maybe seasoning between the oven and searing help accomplish this.

I am wondering if incorporating the broiler at some point in the process might help. Not sure of the order, maybe a reverse sear but then a final dousing of spices and finished in the broiler to get it good and warm. Or would this be too much? And just to reiterate, when I say spices I'm not using a ton - just enough to compliment the flavor of the beef. The beef should stand more or less on it's own, but a little extra zing is usually appreciated by my guests.

And finally, I tried doing some sauces and that certainly is my achilles heal. I think it would be best if there was a basic sauce I could make ahead of time and heat up when I need it. I'm hoping most people will pass on the sauce, but I want to have it available. And since I'm serving it sliced a sauce might be more complimentary to it than if it was a whole steak. The sauce I made tended to be a bit on the wine/viegar I'm thinking a more earthy/herby sauce might work well. Any other ideas for a super basic sauce that would fit the bill? I love peppercorn sauces but not sure if that is ideal.

Thanks again for all of the help. I am really hoping to just nail this steak.

Matt
 
2,834
232
Joined Nov 15, 2012
Either grill or lose the bone. You're never going to get the best pan sear with that bone in there.
 
2,368
670
Joined Feb 8, 2009
As far as I'm concerned it's a gimmick to charge more for the bone. It sounds good on the restaurant menu. The waiter describes it as, The bone marrow juices will penetrate into the fillet to enhance the flavor. I once asked him how he was going to accomplish that with a Rare or Medium Rare. He shrugged.......He tried...... I figure most of the restaurant cuts will be off the Porterhouse...........ChefBillyB DF71ACFC-1963-4DB0-9DCA-5AECCAA00D22.jpeg
 
2,368
670
Joined Feb 8, 2009
Man now you got me craving those two cuts. They don't exist here in France. :emoji_sweat:
French Fries, every time we talk I'm getting you thrown out of the Butcher shop. Try this...

n French, entrec?te (French pronunciation: [ɑ?.t??.kot]) is a premium cut of beef used for steaks.

Contre-filet, cut from the sirloin
A traditional entrec?te comes from the rib area[1][2] corresponding to the steaks known in different parts of the English-speaking world as rib, ribeye, club, Scotch fillet, or Delmonico.
The sirloin cut properly known as a contre-filet is also known as entrec?te. Contre-filet is the portion of the sirloin on the opposite side of the bone from the filet, or tenderloin.[citation needed] In English, a steak cut from the contre-filet may be called a Porterhouse steak (as the term is understood in Australia and New Zealand), a sirloin steak, a strip steak, a striploin steak, a wing steak, a club steak, a Delmonico steak, a New York strip steak, or a Kansas City strip steak. As well, if the contre-filet is left on the bone with the filet, the entire steak is called a Porterhouse steak (as the term is understood in the United States and Canada) or a T-bone steak.
 
2,834
232
Joined Nov 15, 2012
I recall a German-born butcher from 40 years ago. He said, "In Europe no one eats "steak." We cut beef into smaller pieces and make some kind of concoction with it."
 
5,542
443
Joined Sep 5, 2008
French Fries, every time we talk I'm getting you thrown out of the Butcher shop. Try this...

n French, entrec?te (French pronunciation: [ɑ?.t??.kot]) is a premium cut of beef used for steaks.

Contre-filet, cut from the sirloin
A traditional entrec?te comes from the rib area[1][2] corresponding to the steaks known in different parts of the English-speaking world as rib, ribeye, club, Scotch fillet, or Delmonico.
The sirloin cut properly known as a contre-filet is also known as entrec?te. Contre-filet is the portion of the sirloin on the opposite side of the bone from the filet, or tenderloin.[citation needed] In English, a steak cut from the contre-filet may be called a Porterhouse steak (as the term is understood in Australia and New Zealand), a sirloin steak, a strip steak, a striploin steak, a wing steak, a club steak, a Delmonico steak, a New York strip steak, or a Kansas City strip steak. As well, if the contre-filet is left on the bone with the filet, the entire steak is called a Porterhouse steak (as the term is understood in the United States and Canada) or a T-bone steak.
No I know where the different cuts come from, thanks for the info. It's just that cows around here are MUCH bigger than in the U.S., primal are not cut the same way, and my butcher will not start breaking down the entire cow in a different way just for my pretty eyes. While I can see how they could prepare a special cut for me if it doesn't require changing the way they break down the entire animal, for T-Bone and Porterhouse I'm afraid that's not possible. The first thing they do with the ribs is detach the entire tenderloin, so they're not going to saw through the ribs with the tenderloin still attached. Moreover, that would result in a HUGE chunk of meat. A bone-in rib eye steak around here is a piece for 4 to 5 people.

But that's okay. I'll eat porterhouse/T-bone when I visit the U.S. That's the beauty of it all, different countries have different things going for them. Beef here is vastly different in taste, texture and shape than it is in the U.S. I wouldn't say it's better or worse, but it certainly isn't the same — at all.
 
497
178
Joined Sep 17, 2018
I recall a German-born butcher from 40 years ago. He said, "In Europe no one eats "steak." We cut beef into smaller pieces and make some kind of concoction with it."
Reminded me of my Meat fabrication chef. He was from Germany and had the power of a vice grip between his thumb and pointer finger. His knives were always like razors and he would trim out cuts with so little waste. He would pinch a piece of meat trim to show us how to do it, and would say after 5 pieces that was a stein for him.
 
1,989
656
Joined Jan 8, 2010
:) That was 40 years ago!!!

Things have changed in the meantime and steak is being eaten, although more often in restaurants than at home

french fries french fries : I hear where you are coming from. I had the reverse. Being used to the European continental way of cutting up meat, I had to learn the more anglo-saxon way they use here....
Neither is better than the other, just different. As you say: enjoy the differences
??
 
7
0
Joined Dec 16, 2017
Just a quick and long overdue thank-you to everyone who helped me on this thread. I ended up doing a reverse sear on the steaks and they turned out great. It was a several course meal with wine pairing and by that time it was time to cook the steaks I was a bit woozy to be honest - both from the wine and just from working all day. I was told they were a big hit though. I've attached a pic of them before cooking so everyone can see what a bone-in filet looks like. I can't say whether the bone added anything other than a bit of flair, but it didn't really seem to impair the cooking and searing process. Anyway, thanks again everyone for all the advice!

Steaks.jpg
 
Top Bottom
动漫岛 - 十八禁啪漫动漫-成年AV动漫网站